Discovering Wireless Transmission and New Gear

1895 Pontecchio, Italy – As young Guglielmo fidgeted with his super secret device, he probably had no idea what type of technological storm he was about to unleash upon the world.  Just an adjustment here and the world’s first wireless signal would be sent to a receiver a mile an a half away.

The Genius of Wireless Communication

Well Played Marconi, Well Played

That one signal would allow civilization to order pizzas from their homes, stalk each other on Facebook and even send text messages on the freeway at 73 miles per hour.  What Guglielmo Marconi discovered was a new way of transmitting of communication between human beings.  Before we relied on the human voice, print and messages that had to be carried over miles and miles of wires via the telephone.  Now messages could be carried those same distances seemingly in thin air.

One year later Marconi traveled to England with the hopes of showing British telegraph authorities of adopting the new technology for improving communications across the country.  When W.H. Preece, chief engineer of the British Post-office of telegraphs saw what Marconi’s transmitter could accomplish the stage was set for a rapid explosion of wireless communication.   Just 31 years later phone calls could be made from England to the United States. In 1946 mobile phones were now being used in cars.

Yes… people were making calls from their cars and annoying people well before the cell phone ever came into use.

Just over 100 years later we can perform all sorts of functions with wireless signals.  Think about how earth shattering this invention could be.  Now you can completely ignore your family while arguing with people on the internet while using your IPad in a restaurant.  All with Marconi’s discovery.

But there’s one truly helpful, relevant application that Marconi’s discovery of radio waves has created:  the ability to change the heat settings in your heated clothing with a wireless remote.

Good use of wireless communication

Good use of wireless communication

Don’t believe me?  Check out how this works with the New Grand Touring Collection line of 12V gear by clicking here:  GTC

Sources –

Guglielmo Marconi – Biography

John – A History of Wireless Technologies

The Baghdad Battery Mystery

Probably won't work with your TV remote

Probably won’t work with your TV remote

1938 Baghdad, Iraq –  Measuring only 13 cm long (5 inches), archaeologist Wilhelm Konig found the most curious looking object around an ancient Mesopotamian ritual site.  The object was oval in shape and made of clay but what shocked Konig was discovering a copper encased iron rod at the center.  Once the clay jar with the copper rod was brought back for testing, it showed signs of corrosion as if wine or vinegar were held inside.

From this point Konig had a light go off in his head (pun may or may not be intended) that what he actually found was not a decorative item but a battery.  Replicas were made using the exact same materials used in what is know called the “Baghdad Battery” that could produce electrical currents.  But some historians are not convinced the clay pot was a battery.  Some of the critics say the Baghdad Battery lacks wiring and couldn’t transmit a charge.

There is no doubt that it served some sort of practical purpose.

What truly puzzles most researchers and scientists is what the heck the battery was used for?  Some theorize it was used for medicinal purposes which was seen in acupuncture techniques in China.  Ancient Greeks recorded that “electrical fish” probably eels had medicinal powers on injured feet.  The most likely use for the Baghdad Battery was electroplating.  This is the process of layering a thin sheet of metal onto another sheet of metal.

No one is quite sure except the batteries actually produce electricity.  In fact there’s even wild theories the batteries were used in a “Wizard of Oz” type fashion.  Dr. Craddock from the British Museums thinks it’s possible the batteries could have been linked together and been used in the Mesopotamian temples.  When subjects would come in if they did something that displeased the gods a simple touch from their hand to the idol could produce a tiny electrical shock.

604 Battery

This will not shock you

The only thing scientists agree on is they don’t really know what the batteries were  used for.  But one thing we know for sure is the descendants of those batteries allow us to be lazy on the couch watching football, power our cars and of course, power our heated clothing like this:  Men’s Battery Heated Fleece Vest.


Riddle of Baghdad’s Batteries

Smith College Museum – Ancient Inventions

Do I Need To Buy A Battery With My Gear?

Secret Lair In Los Alamitos Office of Venture Heat – Present Day

Lithium Ion Battery

I come with no strings attached

So there’s a little secret we’re going to let you in on…

Now many companies sell battery heated gear…  but did you know that VentureHeat doesn’t make you buy extra batteries or controllers?


нет! (no in Russian)

Negative Ghost Rider!  (no in my cubicle neighbor’s lingo)

OK but you’re probably going to ask do I need to buy a charger?  Let me think about that one….NO!

When you buy VentureHeat gear, everything is ready to go once you open the package.  You’ll get the batteries you need, charger and a full set of instructions so your stuff lasts a long time.

So let’s sum it up:

Gear… battery… charger with no additional purchase!

Now go do some shopping will ya:  Jackets… Vests… Gloves… Oh MY!

The Power and Glory of the Heated Robe

5th Century B.C. – India

If looks could kill..

If looks could kill..

If you were to take a trip back to Ancient India you’d see something quite remarkable.  Young men walking around with long, flowing robes of bright orange colors.   The robe signified the man’s rank as a Buddhist monk with one shoulder being exposed but what’s spectacular about the robes is the material they were made of.  Buddhist monks would take everyday garbage consisting of used up fabrics and create a robe that measured six by nine feet with the most amazing colors.

Literally one person’s trash was another’s treasure.  Buddhist monks turned the robes orange by cleansing the trashed fabrics in a mixture of leaves, roots, flowers and sometimes spices.  From India the trend caught on with the Shaolin Monks of China.  One of the major differences is instead of having one shoulder exposed both were covered.  This was one part traditional custom and another part for practical purposes.  China gets much colder in winter time than does India… much colder!

Now it could be argued the everyday plain old boring bath household robes we think of today took a major turn in terms of their use.  Instead of being mainly for show they were also used for home heating as well.  Ottoman Sultans in Turkey wore them not only to show their rank but because they were on military campaign in Eastern Europe they needed warmth as well.  Here is a picture of Sulieman the Magnificent (or Lawgiver) in a traditional Turkish Robe.  Known as kaftans, these robes can still be seen in the Topkopi Palace in Istanbul and resemble the robes we wear sipping cocoa by the fire today.

Sulieman's Magnificent Robe

Sulieman’s Magnificent Robe

Even in film the robe took on an important role in everyday life.  In “The Lord of The Rings” trilogy Gandolf used the powers of his robe to not only defeat the oncoming orcs but taught the hobbits life lessons all while never changing his robe once.

As the use of robes expanded into religious ceremony and academia, they began to become more useful for keeping warm in one’s home.  In the 1870s tea gowns became ultra popular among women featuring a blend of style and comfort during indoor tea time.  Now we know the robe as something we throw on when it’s cold in the home.  Most people feel the thick, furriness of their robe and head immediately to the couch and start watching their favorite TV program.

But still there was something missing.  Every time you needed to change channels, get a drink or chase away the magazine salesman at the door you got cold all over again.  Of course, now that we’re in an era that thrives on technology you can get a classic robe combined with an electric blanket.

Meet the Huggy Buddy!  Click here

The Weird History of Long Johns


victorianerawomenLong Johns… A Fashion Statement?

England 1879 – A new garment revolutionizes women’s fashion… and keeping warm during chilly nights.  Long Johns can be traced back to the 17th century but they gained prominence in the late 1800s.  Victorian era women in Europe and North America used the funny underwear with a trap door (for convenience) to enhance their looks.  Let the good professor explain…

Here’s how University of Alberta professor Anne Bissonnette tells it:

“With women, we traditionally had an accumulation of undergarments or underpinnings,” Bissonnette says. “It all accumulated at the waist.”

Professor Bissonnette explains that Victorian era women in terms of beauty were judged on how thick their waist lines were.  As the temperatures dropped and women needed extra layers for warmth Long Johns saved the day by keeping waist lines from expanding and women stayed toasty.

Don't make fun of  my Long Johns!

Don’t make fun of my Long Johns!

But where exactly did the name “Long Johns” come from?

Pictured here, Sullivan routinely wore garments that closely resembled Long Johns during his fights.  In fact John L would tuck the legs of his undies into his shoes stretching them out.  Is this where the name came from?  Who really knows?  Another theory of the Long John saga puts the name on a famous 17th century knife fighter with the nick name “Long John” who wore the trapped door garments.

But Long Johns continued making key contributions to our civilization during World War II.  If you asked soldiers in the brutal Ardenne Campaign what their trustiest piece of equipment was… almost hands down it was their Long Johns.  While keep the soldiers warm against the nasty winter weather they faced their Long Johns did give them two major issues:

1) They itched.  Some soldiers swore they would itch their skin right off (but they were glad for the warmth)

2) Sweat.  Long Johns made of wool were so warm they in fact got too hot and caused the soldiers to perspire which added to the discomfort

None the less the story of Long Johns continues on into the 21st century without the worry of itching, sweating and the thickness of waist lines.  Instead of itchy wool you can get a polyester blend material that even John L Sullivan could easily win prize fights in.

Take a look at the new Tri-Zone base layers:

Tops – Link

Bottoms – Link


The Unofficial History of Long Johns – The Toronto Star

Long Johns – World Wide Words

The Long History of Long Johns – St. Albert Gazette