ESPNW Reviews Heated Base Layer Pants

Hello Venture Heat Fans,

Today’s article is an edited version of an original story from espnW. If you’d like to read the entire story, click here.

 

Gear we love: Six pieces that will keep you REALLY warm

By Cristina Goyanes | Feb 23, 2017
Special to espnW.com

Snow sport lovers, from novice to expert, might know the popular adage: “There’s no such thing as bad weather — only bad gear.” With the imminent threat of the polar vortex — gusts of unbearably cold air usually reserved for the Arctic — a regular puffer and gloves might not be enough to keep you comfortably warm and cozy for a wintery day outside.

With this in mind, I found six sweet pieces of gear that fit the bill, and I brought them with me to Alberta, Canada, where the temps ranged from 30 to minus-5 degrees Fahrenheit during my visit, to put them to the test. (Another major appeal for heading northwest from my New York City base: All Canadian national parks are free to the public this year to celebrate the country’s 150th anniversary. If you’ve ever wanted to cross the border, now’s the time!)

Here’s how each item helped me brave the elements and enjoy five days of cold-weather activities — snowboarding, snowshoeing, dog sledding and ice walking — in comfort and with a smile, minus one meltdown on the slopes (more on that below).

ESPNW Heated Base Layer Pants 2

The details: These fleece-lined long johns feature hair-thin microfiber heat panels woven into each knee and thigh and the lower back. An exterior controller hangs over your outer pant, so you can easily change the heat settings (low, medium, high) with the push of a button. A long-lasting, rechargeable, lithium-ion battery gets stashed in the right pocket.

How I tested them: A full day of snowboarding at Lake Louise Ski Resort and two half-days at Sunshine Village (both of which are located within Banff National Park), plus a two-hour dog sledding tour with Mad Dogs & Englishmen Expeditions over the frozen Spray Lakes in Kananaskis Country. The key moment: sitting at the top of a green run at Sunshine Village and having a five-minute meltdown in the snow.

What I liked: As a beginner snowboarder, I spent a lot more time on my butt and knees than upright. Whether I accidentally crashed or purposely plopped down to enjoy the breathtaking mountain views, these pants shielded me from the snow’s frosty bite. They really came to the rescue on day one at Sunshine Village: After a frazzled start to my morning (I unintentionally missed a private lesson) and an epic dismount from the chairlift (I lost my balance and cartwheeled off to the side), staring down my first green run of the season felt too overwhelming. Naturally, I sat in the snow at the top of the hill and cried — but just for a few minutes! The pants kept me warm, though, and soon enough, I was able to get back up and make my way down the mountain.

What I didn’t: The clunky battery sat on my hip in my right pocket. Because falling was a huge part of my day on the slopes, I worried about landing on this bulky block and smashing it against my bone. I got inventive and cinched the inner pocket carrying the battery above my waistline. This way, when I fell, it dug into my stomach, which was still uncomfortable but wasn’t dangerous. Also, I’m blessed with a bit more real estate in the backside. It would have been nice if my heat panel in the rear offered fuller coverage.

Are they worth it? No doubt, especially if you think you might find yourself lounging in the snow during your winter adventures. ($129.99, thewarmingstore.com)

Read the original article here on www.espnW.com.

 

Venture Heat Assists With Eagle Photography During Cold Winter

Every once in a while our friends that have purchased our products send us updates on what they’re up to while using our heated clothing. Just recently, Dixie Kurtz from Iowa sent us a nice note and a few photos of her photography club, the Quad City Photography Club, wearing our winter sports heated glove liners to keep their hands warm when out taking photos in the frigid temperatures of the Iowan winter.

“I am a happy owner of your glove liners. My husband bought them for me for Christmas. I do a lot of eagle photography and live in Iowa where it is sometimes extremely cold. As a member of a photography club I have talked these glove liners up to a few of our members and several have purchased them. I know of at least four people who I have sent your way. If I could have carried an inventory I could have made a few bucks, haha!

Anyway, we have a winter seminar every year which incorporates eagle photography. I’m enclosing a picture of two of our club members that bought your gloves already! The photo shows how cold it is here! Our website is  https://qcphotoclub.com/.

As you can see the glove liners can make for a great day!

Thank you again!

Dixie Kurtz

Vice President

Quad City Photography Club

P.S. Here’s an eagle shot that I took.”

Quad City Photography Club taking some outdoor photos with a little help from Venture Heat's heated glove liners

Quad City Photography Club taking some outdoor photos with a little help from Venture Heat’s heated glove liners

 

Photo of an eagle in flight, photographed by Dixie, while wearing Venture Heat's heated glove liners

Photo of an eagle in flight, photographed by Dixie, while wearing Venture Heat’s heated glove liners

Dixie and the Quad City Photography Club wearing Venture Heat Glove Liners

Dixie and the Quad City Photography Club wearing Venture Heat Glove Liners

Road Runner Motorcycle Mag Reviews our Heated Jacket Liner and Carbon Gloves

Our GT-40 heated jacket liner and heated “Carbon” gloves were reviewed in the latest issue of Road Runner Motorcycle Touring and Travel magazine. We were excited for the testing because we know the Road Runner crew ride more miles in a week than most ride in a year, so it was the perfect opportunity for our motorcycle gear to warm up a few miles of their winter roads.

Long-distance motorcycle riders and those that ride year-round are extraordinarily tough, but there’s a few secrets hidden under that hardy exterior that keep them on the road. Temperature controlled heated motorcycle gear is one of those secrets. For instance, heated jacket liners are lightweight and minimize bulkiness while dexterity is maintained- which is very important for safe riding. And now, the secret is getting out. More and more everyday riders are starting to use heated gear regularly because it has evolved into practical, easy-to-use, and durable protection from the cold.

If you’re interested in heated gear and would like a third party opinion- take a look at what the folks at Road Runner had to say; view each image or visit Road Runner’s website: www.roadrunner.travel

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Venture Heat Winter Show Schedule 2016 to 2017

Do we really need to justify attending a motorcycle show to you? In addition to the unveiling of new bikes from all the OEMs, the latest parts from aftermarket manufacturers, and incredible deals you can get at a show, we’ll give you one more reason to participate: try on heated motorcycle gear for yourself!

We’ll be at these upcoming International Motorcycle Shows (IMS) over the next few months. Come by our booth to see our new, innovative Hybrid powered gear and experience our proven heated clothing for yourself. We have multiple sizes and styles available, plus friendly staff at the booth to assist you with any heated motorcycle gear questions you might have.

  • December 9-11, 2016 New York, New York. At the Javits Center
  • January 6-8, 2017 Washington D.C.  At the Walter E. Washington Convention Center
  • January 13-15, 2017, Dallas, Texas. At the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
  • January 27-29, 2017 Cleveland, Ohio. At the I-X Center
  • February 3-5, 2017 Minneapolis, Minnesota. At the Minneapolis Convention Center
  • February 10-12, 2017 Chicago, Illinois. At the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center
Long Beach IMS

I don’t always pretend like I’m riding a motorcycle, but when I do, I make “vroom, vroom” sounds.

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Cycle World Reviews Venture Heat Motorcycle Gear

In case you missed the article in Cycle World magazine, here’s what they had to say about our heated vest liner, pants liner, gloves and insoles:

(See the original article here)

CW Evaluation: Venture Heat Grand Touring Collection Electric Clothing

Get warmly wired, from head to toe.

Leaving Abilene, Texas, the thermometer hadn’t broken 40 degrees and the windchill from the 35-mph breeze put temps slightly below freezing. I was headed north from the COTA MotoGP race, directly into the wind, and had a long ride ahead of me that had to happen as I was flying east the next day. It would prove to be one of the toughest days I’ve had on a motorcycle and there’s only one reason I rolled into my driveway 12 hours later: Venture Heat’s electric clothing.

The Venture Heat Grand Touring Collection vest, pant-liners, insoles and gloves had arrived the day before I left Colorado and they stayed neatly packed all the way to Austin, taking up valuable room in my small luggage and mocking me for this wasted space as I rode to Texas in comfortable 70-degree temps. I had replaced the Alpinestars insoles in my boots with the Venture Heat wired insoles and felt stupid every time I thought about it.

Motorcycle Heated Clothing and Gloves

Motorcycle Heated Clothing and Gloves

But that all changed five days later as I woke up in Abilene to whistling wind and the type of conditions that make even a Prius look good. I slipped into the vest and pant-liners, which are both extremely soft, flexible and have the same bulk as a good workout suit. I plugged the insoles into the bottom of the pant-liners, hooked the liners to the vest, plugged into my FZ1 and headed into the wind. Fifteen minutes later I stopped.

My hands were frozen and almost useless. I clawed through my luggage and pulled out the Venture Heat Carbon Street gloves. I’ve never been a big fan of cold-weather gloves due to the added bulk, reduced feel and reduced crash protection, but the Carbon gloves go a long way toward alleviating those concerns, especially in terms of protection. They have 3M Thinsulate insulation and a waterproof membrane. By definition they have to be a bit more bulky than the Alpinestars GP Pros I was wearing, but I was at the end of my rope that morning and literally could not have continued. Call me wimpy, but you had to be there to feel the misery. In 12 hours I saw only one other motorcycle on the road and twice I saw 37 degrees on bank signs. It snowed on me and I rode past miles of plowed snow left from the night before. The headwind never abated.

The Venture Heat stuff is outstandingly comfortable. The bulky coils of yesteryear have been replaced with hair-thin microfibers for instant heat and all-day comfort, which the company has dubbed “Xtreme Comfort Tech.” You will feel the insole wire running up behind your heel and it could get uncomfortable to walk in, but my Yamaha didn’t require me to walk. The Grand Touring collection pant-liners and vest each have separate power buttons that reside on a flap that sticks out about three inches for access on your left hip. I wore the clothing under a one-piece nylon riding suit and could access the power buttons through a zippered opening. One long push turns the gear on high (red glow from the power button), and two more quick pushes change to medium (yellow) and low (green), with another long push for off. I ran jacket and pants on high and then medium when I donned my rain jacket to blunt the wind sneaking through my suit’s shoulder seams. The heat hits immediately and I challenge you not to giggle when it comes on.

Glove power buttons are on the gauntlets. Plugs connect to cords that run up your sleeves to the vest. Due to the small fairing on my FZ1, I ran the gloves on high for most of the trip, switching to medium only twice when my speeds came down in larger cities. The fit and feel of the leather and nylon gloves improved substantially during the ride as they broke in, and a nice touch is the fingertip fabric on index fingers to access your electronic touch-screens when needed. Venture Heat also offers a full-sleeve heated liner for your upper body and the conditions I faced may have warranted that option.

This is a glowing review because Venture Heat has created an outstanding product in its Grand Touring Collection. Comfort and looks are exceptional and the gloves are the best compromise I’ve tried for cold-weather riding. Reaching the control flaps isn’t as easy as accessing a power-cord switch or thermostat, but each article of clothing can be adjusted separately, with the exception of the insoles; these are on any time the pant-liners are on and it’s interesting that I never felt true heat under my foot, but my feet were never cold. Venture Heat has found a good insole heat setting, at least for the conditions I faced. A handlebar-mount wireless remote is available to manage heat level without fumbling for the power flaps.

This outfit plugs into the bike’s 12-volt system and provides limitless warmth (as long as your charging system can keep up with the total draw of 170 watts for all the pieces), as opposed to self-powered rechargeable clothing that would not have lasted during my 12-hour ride from COTA. The fused power cord attaches directly to the bike’s battery and everything interconnects quickly. My maiden test with the Grand Touring vest, pant liner, gloves and insoles came in dire conditions and this gear was up to the task.